Detailed Programme

Area A: Functional Materials

Area coordinators:
Lindsay Greer (Univ. Cambridge, UK) - alg13@cam.ac.uk
Paula Vilarinho (Univ. Aveiro, PT) - paula.vilarinho@ua.pt

A1: Emerging Topics

A1.1: Materials for Energy Harvesting

Sohini Kar-Narayan (Univ. Cambridge, UK) - sk568@cam.ac.uk
David Muñoz-Rojas (Lab. Matér. Génie Physique, Grenoble INP-CNRS, FR) - David.Munoz-Rojas@grenoble-inp.fr
Albert Tarancón (Catalonia Institute for Energy Research, IREC, Barcelona, ES) - atarancon@irec.cat

There is nowadays an increasing need for energy autonomy caused by the fast-paced developments in wireless sensor networks and consumer electronics including flexible, wearable and embedded devices. As a result, the possibility of obtaining portable power sources based on energy harvesting from the ambient environment has received considerable interest of late. This symposium will review recent trends in the field of energy harvesting with a focus on new materials that are driving the field forward. In this respect, the symposium will broadly cover advances in materials for vibrational, photovoltaic and thermoelectric energy harvesting, with an aim to encourage cross-fertilization of ideas for hybrid power solutions. Topics that will be covered include, among others, novel processing techniques for nanostructured materials with high energy-conversion efficiencies, theory and modelling of materials for energy harvesting, and innovative design, performance and integration of energy harvesters for small-power applications.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Chris Bowen (Univ. Bath, UK)
Pablo Docampo (Ludwig Maximilians Univ., München, DE)
Steve Dunn (Queen Mary Univ. London, UK)
Luis Fonseca (Inst. Microelectronics of Barcelona, IMB-CNM, ES)
Keon Jae Lee (KAIST, Daejeon, KR),
Nini Pryds (DTU, Roskilde, DK)
Jonathan Scragg (Uppsala Univ., SE)
Ali Shakouri (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN, USA)
Mariano Campoy-Quiles (ICMAB-CSIC)

A1.2: Active Soft Materials

Samuel Sánchez (Max-Planck-Inst. for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart, DE) - sanchez@is.mpg.de
Stoyan Smoukov (Univ. Cambridge, UK) - sks46@cam.ac.uk

Soft active materials are still a relatively overlooked area in Materials Science. This important, new generation of artificial smart materials promises to create the machines of tomorrow. It also has a better chance to interface with living systems than today?s hard, multi-component machines. Soft materials have a number of advantages (conformability, unique shape/size changes, and similar mechanical moduli to biological tissues) and have shown responses to multiple stimuli. Their complex types of deformations challenge material design, guided largely by current modes of actuation (electrical motors, hard piezoelectrics, etc.). The static and dynamical three dimensional structures of soft materials, as well as the nature of their responses, are incompletely understood and modelled, and much of the possible responses are not even mapped. This symposium will emphasize both experimental and theoretical approaches that describe the connection between microscopic building block interactions and desired soft matter responses. ?Active Soft Materials? will be a forum for discussing fundamental mechanisms and applications of responsive soft materials. The symposium aims to map and bring a better understanding of the design, hierarchy, and variety of responses in soft materials. Research reports demonstrating multiple responses (mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic, biochemical, geometrical shape) in materials are especially welcome. Integration of soft responsive materials as implants or in tissue engineering scaffolds are encouraged. Contributions are encouraged in, but are not limited to, the following areas:
• active soft material multiple responses (coupled or independent), induced by light, magnetic, electric fields, chemical concentration gradients, and/or specific molecular recognition
• strategies for achieving multi-stable functional states
• designing shape responses with microfluidic, pneumatic, and other architectures
• theoretical modelling of materials response from interactions among building blocks
• directed/programmed colloidal and (bio)polymer assembly and disassembly. Dynamic phase transitions between metastable states, e.g., cellular cytoskeleton chain dynamics
• novel types of responsive soft matter or novel applications – responsive foams, emulsions, nonlinear acoustic materials, responsive tissue scaffolds, etc.
• devices powered by soft responsive materials and future potential applications.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Kyle Bishop (Penn State Univ., University Park PA, USA)
Peer Fischer (MPI Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart, DE)
Ramin Golestanian (Oxford Univ., UK)
Jan van Hest (Radboud Univ., Nijmegen, NL)
Leonid Ionov (Leibniz Inst. Polymer Res., Dresden, DE)
Orlin Velev (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh NC, USA)
Daniela Wilson (Radboud Univ., Nijmegen, NL)
Qiming Zhang (Penn State Univ., University Park PA, USA)
Xuanhe Zhao (MIT, Cambridge MA, USA)

A1.3: Functional Nanostructures and Self-Assembled Materials

Luís Carlos (Univ. Aveiro, PT) - lcarlos@ua.pt
Rute A. S. Ferreira (Univ. Aveiro, PT) - rferreira@ua.pt
Marek Grzelczak (CIC biomaGUNE, San Sebastián, ES) - mgrzelczak@cicbiomagune.es
Luis Liz-Marzán (Univ. Vigo, ES) - llizmarzan@cicbiomagune.es

Successful implementation of nanostructures in real-world devices requires practicable control of their spatial distribution over extended length-scales. Control over nanostructural organization provides extraordinary tools that help not only to advance actual technology, but also to discover new phenomena. From an applied point of view, the transition from the properties of nanostructures 'in solution' to device-oriented substrates provides a straightforward path for the improvement of existing technologies by means of new active materials. On a fundamental level, the self-organization of building blocks into nanostructures leads to the emergence of new collective properties that are not possible at the level of the individual units. This duality of applied and fundamental concepts makes self-assembly one of the most appealing targets in nanoscience. This symposium covers the field of nanostructural self-assembly with a focus on novel architectures and new properties with technological relevance. The symposium aims to include following areas:
• self-assembly of nanoparticles on solid substrates for devices in biosensing, catalysis, light harvesting, photovoltaics, etc.
• liquid-phase self-assembly — from artificial molecules/polymers to supercrystals
• emergence of nanoscale properties: plasmonic aromaticity, chirality, etc.
• directed self-assembly — reversible organized systems triggered by external stimuli (light, temperature, magnetic field) or internal factors (chemical gradient, solvent composition) for drug delivery, bio-imaging, hyperthermia or switchable catalysis
• self-assembly in flow
• theoretical models for better prediction of multiparticle systems
• in-situ imaging and visualization of assemblies
• phenomena in collective systems: hot-spot engineering, electron and energy transfer, etc.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Maksym Kovalenko (ETH Zürich, CH)
Tim Liedl (Ludwig Maximilians-Univ. München, DE)
Stefano Sacanna (New York Univ., NY, USA)
Sámuel Sánchez (MPI IS Stuttgart, DE)

A2: Carbon-Based Materials

Topic coordinators:
Eric Anglaret (Univ. Montpellier, FR) - eric.anglaret@univ-montp2.fr
Juan Vilatela (IMDEA Materials, Madrid, ES) - juanjose.vilatela@imdea.org

A2.1: Composites with nanocarbon reinforcement and other nanofillers

Eric Anglaret (Univ. Montpellier, FR) - eric.anglaret@univ-montp2.fr
Ian Kinloch (Univ. Manchester, UK) - Ian.Kinloch@manchester.ac.uk
Tadeusz Spychaj (West Pomeranian Univ. Technology, Szczecin, PL) - Tadeusz.Spychaj@zut.edu.pl
Wlodek Strupinski (Inst. Electronic Materials Technol., Warsaw, PL) - wlodek.strupinski@itme.edu.pl
Juan Vilatela (IMDEA Materials, Madrid, ES) - juanjose.vilatela@imdea.org

Most high-performance composites derive their mechanical properties from the high strength/stiffness and light weight of graphitic layers, which are the basis of carbon fibres. The new class of nanoscale graphitic materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes and graphene) combines exceptional mechanical properties with high electrical and thermal conductivities, significantly superior to those of carbon fibres. Yet, their small size implies that they need to be assembled as building blocks to form much larger macroscopic structures, such as composites; the implicit challenge being to obtain their properties on the final macroscopic material. Typical integration routes include: dispersing the nanocarbon as a filler in a polymer matrix, depositing/growing it directly on selected locations of a FRP, or pre-assembling it into a macroscopic fibre which can later be incorporated in a matrix. This symposium aims at comparing the preparation and properties of different composites containing carbon in graphitic form (CF, CNT, graphene, VGCF), and includes the following areas of interest:
• fabrication of nanocarbon composites
• multifunctional properties of nanocarbon composites
• nanocarbon-based fibres (fibres made of CNTs or graphene)
• addition of nanocarbons to standard FRP
• industrial production of nanocarbons for composites
• composites with carbon reinforcement in polymer and metal matrices.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Alexander Bismarck (Univ. Vienna, AT)
Jonathan Coleman (Trinity College Dublin, IE)
Robert Young (Univ. Manchester, UK)

Area B: Structural Materials

Area coordinators:
Jürgen Hirsch (DE) - Juergen.Hirsch@hydro.com
Małgorzata Lewandowska (TU Warsaw, PL) - malew@inmat.pw.edu.pl

B1: Advanced Metals

B1.1: Lightweight (Al, Mg, Ti-based) Alloys

Jürgen Hirsch (DE) - Juergen.Hirsch@hydro.com
Phil Prangnell (Univ. of Manchester, UK) - philip.prangnell@manchester.ac.uk
Joe Robson (Univ. of Manchester, UK) - joseph.d.robson@manchester.ac.uk

Growth in the use of the light metals is rapidly increasing because of their important role in reducing our dependence on fossil fuels, through providing cost-effective solutions for mass reduction in transport. This is also changing the way light metals are being used and increasing the demand for new higher-performance alloys, products, and new manufacturing technologies. For example, in the near future multi-material automotive structural designs, consisting of a high percentage of aluminium and magnesium parts, combined with steel and composites, will enter the mainstream market. This rapid development in light-metal technology is presenting current metallurgical knowledge with many challenges, which will be the focus of this symposium.
This symposium will focus on the most important light metals and will cover the more fundamental metallurgical issues that arise from their development and processing, for use in lightweight and multi-material designs, in advanced modern transport systems and structural applications. It will provide a platform for academic and industrial researchers, scientists and engineers to present and discuss recent development and progress. It addresses specific advances, problems and highlights, covering:
• all fundamental aspects of lightweight alloys and their (physical) metallurgy
• the development and design of new higher-performance alloys for advanced lightweight applications and products in automobiles, aerospace and other relevant transport and building systems
• their interaction with advanced joining and manufacturing technologies (e.g. additive manufacturing, forming, welding) in conventional and multi-material designs
• fundamental issues that affect their properties in demanding applications
• their microstructure evolution, processing, and advanced simulation and modelling of their behaviour and properties.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Alexis Deschamps (INP Grenoble, FR)
Letzig Dietmar (Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, DE)
Peter Schumacher (MontanUniv. Leoben, AT)

B1.2: New Trends in Design and Development of Advanced Steels

Francisca G. Caballero (CENIM, Madrid, ES) - fgc@cenim.csic.es
Carlos Capdevila (CENIM, Madrid, ES) - ccm@cenim.csic.es
Wiesław Świątnicki (Warsaw Univ. of Technology, PL) - wswiatni@inmat.pw.edu.pl

This symposium will showcase some of the most exciting developments in steel science and technology. It is intended to be an open dialogue to discuss the potential and plausibility of new alloy and processing strategies including TRIP- and TWIP-assisted steels, nanostructured steels and oxide-dispersion-strengthened steels that are currently being explored in the modern steel industry. In addition, consideration of fundamental investigations on advanced and complex steel structures will shed novel light on the applicability of theory, modelling and advanced techniques on the design and manufacturing of these kinds of materials.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
John Hald (Tech. Univ. Denmark, Lyngby, DK)
Bruno De Cooman (POSTECH, Pohang, KR)
Akihiro Kimura (Kyoto Univ., JP)

B1.3: Metallic Glasses, Rapid Solidification, Nanocrystallization

Galina Abrosimova (Inst. of Solid State Physics, Russian Acad. of Sci., Chernogolovka, RU) - gea@issp.ac.ru
Alexander Aronin (Inst. of Solid State Physics, Russian Acad. of Sci., Chernogolovka, RU) - aronin@issp.ac.ru
Mariana Calin (IFW, Dresden, DE) - M.Calin@ifw-dresden.de

Glassy alloys (metallic glasses) are currently the focus of intense research in the international metals community. The glassy state is reached when a cooled liquid solidifies without crystallization, which is associated with the phenomena of the glass transition. Bulk metallic glasses are known to have attractive properties and processing opportunities.
The close links between the thermodynamic, kinetic, elastic, and plastic properties of metallic glasses are remarkable, and appear to provide predictability for these apparently disordered systems at a level that far exceeds that for their ordered crystalline counterparts. A key challenge is to understand these correlations, which may have common structural origins, and exploit such understanding to develop new glass compositions that combine a good glass forming ability with desirable mechanical properties. This would permit a more widespread application of these paradigm-shifting materials.
This symposium aims to cover the fundamentals underlying the properties, processing and structure of glassy metallic materials, and highlight their performances that are attractive for structural and functional applications in technology and biomedicine. The coverage includes (but is not limited to) topics such as: glass formation in metallic systems; processing methods; alloy development strategies; structure - chemistry - property relationships; structure characterization (including theory and computer modelling); physical, chemical and mechanical properties; mechanisms of plastic deformation; shear bands and localized deformation; industrial and biomedical applications. Contributions from both theoretical and experimental points of view are welcome.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Wojciech Dmowski (Univ. Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA)
Lindsay Greer (Univ. Cambridge, UK)
Jean-Marc Pelletier (INSA, Lyon, FR)
Paola Rizzi (Univ. Turin, IT)

B2: Advanced Ceramics

Topic coordinators:
Marc Anglada (ETSEIB, Barcelona) - marc.J.anglada@upc.edu
Anne Leriche (LMCPA, Univ. Valenciennes) - anne.leriche@univ-valenciennes.fr

B2.1: Advanced synthesis methods for ceramic powders

Samuel Bernard (IEM Montpellier, FR) - samuel.bernard@univ-montp2.fr
Emanuel Ionescu (TU Darmstadt, DE) - ionescu@materials.tu-darmstadt.de

The symposium will cover synthesis methods based on organometallic and inorganic chemistry to prepare ceramics from single-source precursors. Particular focus will be placed on the relationship between the molecular structure of the single-source ceramic precursor and the nano-/microstructure/properties of the precursor-derived ceramics. The coverage will include (but is not limited to) the following highlighted topics:
• Methods of forming single-source ceramic precursors: inorganic and organo/inorganometallic compounds (e.g. alane-, borane-, gallane-based compounds, borazines, silanes, silazanes, metallocenes, metal alkoxides, metal amido complexes, metal carbenes, etc.) and macromolecular precursors: sol-gel systems (silica-, metal-oxide-based), pre-ceramic polymers (silicon-containing polymers, boron-containing polymers, aluminum-containing polymers, etc.), hydrothermal methods.
• Transformation into ceramics: gas-phase pyrolysis processes (chemical/physical vapour deposition), liquid-phase pyrolysis processes (spray-pyrolysis), thermal treatment, irradiation-assisted techniques (laser and plasma based methods), HT/HP techniques.

B2.2: Advanced Processing Methods for Ceramics

Jens Günster (TU Clausthal, DE) - jens.guenster@bam.de
Zhijian Shen (DMEC, Stockholm Univ., SE) - shen@mmk.su.se

This symposium will review the current state of the advanced processing methods for ceramics that must show superior properties under demanding conditions. Focus will be placed on the development of new concepts and technologies for processing of ceramics of all types.
The coverage will include (but is not limited to) the following highlighted topics:
• novel forming methods: wet-chemistry processes for green bodies with minimized defects, ice-templating, additive manufacturing and 3D printing, soft solution, templates and self assembly, processing of large-scale/complicated-shape parts
• novel sintering methods: rapid synthesis and sintering based on SHS, SPS, microwave, flash-sintering, laser-sintering, Joule heating.

B2.3: Advanced Ceramic Composites

René Pailler (LCTS, Univ. Bordeaux, FR) - pailler@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr
Mike Pomeroy (Univ. Limerick, IE) - michael.pomeroy@ul.ie

The conditions under which engineering materials are required to operate are becoming more and more challenging. An example is use at higher temperatures to allow reduction of exhaust emissions and noise, and the saving of energy. Answers to these numerous challenges include the use of new lighter materials, resistant to the higher-temperature requirement and more resistant to cracking. Here a key role is played by ceramic-matrix composites. This symposium will be devoted to recent achievements on composition development, design, modelling and processing of micro-, nano- and glass-ceramic matrices toughened by particles, fibres, and nanotubes. Successful manufacture of the new composites requires new technologies as well as new methods to characterize their thermal and mechanical properties, and their oxidation resistance under extreme environmental conditions. The symposium will put particular emphasis on multiscale structure-property relationships and matrix/reinforcing phase interface reactions.

B3: Composite and Hybrid Materials

Topic coordinators:
Werner Hufenbach (TU Dresden, DE) - ilk@ilk.mw.tu-dresden.de

B3.1: Composite Materials and Structures

Maik Gude (TU Dresden, DE) - m.gude@ilk.mw.tu-dresden.de
Tadeusz Uhl (AGH, Cracow, PL) - tuhl@agh.edu.pl

Lightweight engineering with composites offers numerous advantages compared to conventional designs. Here, multifunctional composites with a high degree of function-integration are of particular interest. The integration of additional functional components such as material-embedded actuators or sensors in thermoplastic lightweight structures enables targeted manipulation of the dynamic and vibro-acoustic structural behaviour. As well as function integration such as quality monitoring or active vibration and noise control, structural applications, e.g. in morphing structures and compliant mechanisms, are also possible. Since there does exist a variety of appropriate efficient composites manufacturing technologies, the novel group of multifunctional composites is predestined for future lightweight applications within different industries.

B3.2: Metal-Matrix Composites

Rajiv Asthana (Univ. Wisconsin Stout, USA) - asthanar@uwstout.edu
Jerzy Sobczak (Instytut Odlewnictwa, PL) - Sobczak@IOd.krakow.pl

Rajiv Asthana (Univ. Wisconsin Stout, USA) - asthanar@uwstout.edu
Jerzy Sobczak (Instytut Odlewnictwa, PL) - Sobczak@IOd.krakow.pl
This symposium will provide a forum for the exchange of knowledge, experience and ideas on the latest developments and trends in the field of metal-matrix composites. The main topics cover all relevant aspects of the science, technology, economics and applications of metal matrix composites, including (but not limited to) the overall themes of processing, property characterization, modelling, interface design, and recycling.
Publication of proceedings: selected papers from this Symposium, subject to peer review, will be published in the Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Prof. Dr. Karl Ulrich Kainer

Area C: Processing

Area coordinators:
Boris Straumal (Inst. Solid State Physics, Chernogolovka, RU) - straumal@issp.ac.ru
Pawel Zięba (Inst. Metallurgy and Materials Science, Cracow, PL) - p.zieba@imim.pl

C1: Severe Plastic Deformation and Nanostructuring

Topic coordinators:
Yulia Ivanisenko (KIT, Karlsruhe, DE) - julia.ivanisenko@kit.edu
Eberhard Kerscher (Univ. Kaiserslautern, DE) - kerscher@mv.uni-kl.de

C1.1: Severe Plastic Deformation and Nanostructuring

Andrea Bachmaier (Univ. des Saarlandes, DE) - a.bachmaier@matsci.uni-sb.de
Yulia Ivanisenko (KIT, Karlsruhe, DE) - julia.ivanisenko@kit.edu
Eberhard Kerscher (Univ. Kaiserslautern, DE) - kerscher@mv.uni-kl.de
Erhard Schafler (Univ. Vienna, AT) - erhard.schafler@univie.ac.at

In recent years there has been a growing interest in a novel approach to the fabrication of bulk nanostructured metals and alloys which is an alternative to the conventional compaction of nanopowders. This new approach is based on microstructure refinement in bulk billets through the application of severe plastic deformation (SPD) involving heavy straining under a high imposed pressure. It is important to emphasize that SPD-produced nanomaterials are fully dense and their large geometric dimensions are attractive for use in industrial applications. The fabrication of bulk nanostructured materials by SPD is now becoming one of the most actively developing areas in the field of nanomaterials. This Symposium provides a unique opportunity to bring together experts working in the field of SPD in order to discuss the actual scientific problems in the field such as
• microstructure evolution and grain refinement in single- and multi-phase alloys and composites
• mechanically driven phase transformations
• the correlation between the SPD-induced microstructures and the resulting mechanical properties
• strategies to enhance the microstructure stability at elevated temperatures and cyclic loading
• new developments of tailoring/grading mechanical properties of ultrafine grained (UFG) materials by SPD-processing
• the deformation mechanisms in UFG materials related to SPD-processing
• the novel SPD processes as well as recent advancements of established processing methods

Invited speakers: Xavier Sauvage, Kaveh Edalati, Ludovic Thilly, Thomas Waitz, Mathias Göken, Malgorzhata Lewandowska, Martin Wagner, D. Kiener, Michael Zehetbauer, Laszlo Toth

C2: Joining and Interfaces

Topic coordinators:
Robert Filipek (Univ. AGH, Cracow, PL) - rof@agh.edu.pl
Jolanta Janczak-Rusch (EMPA, CH) - Jolanta.Janczak@empa.ch

Publication of proceedings: selected papers from this Topic, subject to peer review, will be published in the Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance.

C2.1: Joining Technologies

Ivan Kaban (IFW, Dresden, DE) - i.kaban@ifw-dresden.de
Joanna Wojewoda-Budka (Inst. Metallurgy and Materials Science, Cracow, PL) - j.wojewoda@imim.pl

This symposium will address the scientific and engineering issues in joining, especially in relation to new emerging materials and ever-increasing requirements on the performance, reliability and durability of joints. The symposium will provide an attractive forum for presentation and discussion of recent advances in joining technologies, materials and characterization. It will include, but will not be limited to, the following topics:
• joining technologies and applications (soldering, brazing, diffusion bonding, transient liquid phase bonding)
• characterization of joints (methods; mechanical properties, thermal, corrosion and wear resistance and lifetime prediction)
• nanomaterials in joining
• ecological and economical aspects of joining.

C2.2: Interface Design and Modelling

Lars Jeurgens (EMPA, CH) - lars.jeurgens@empa.ch
Krzysztof Szyszkiewicz-Warzecha (Univ. AGH, Cracow, PL) - szyszkin@ceramrtr.ceramika.agh.edu.pl

This symposium addresses current scientific and technological progress in the microstructural engineering and modelling of internal interfaces in nanostructured filler materials and their joined assemblies for targeted optimization of functional material properties. Important topics to be covered include experimental investigations and theoretical predictions of:
• interface-controlled and/or size-dependent phenomena in nano-structured materials
• diffusion, intermixing, segregation, pre-melting and interfacial compound formation at solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces between metals, semiconductors, alloys and ceramics
• defect structures, local atomic compositions and/or strain fields at coherent and semi-coherent interfaces between metals, semiconductors, alloys and ceramics
• first-principles calculations and multi-scale modelling of interface-controlled phenomena in advanced engineering materials.

C2.3: Wetting and High-Temperature Capillarity

Natalia Sobczak (Foundry Research Inst., Cracow, PL) - natalia.sobczak@iod.krakow.pl
Boris Straumal (Inst. Solid State Physics, Chernogolovka, RU) - straumal@issp.ac.ru

The symposium aims to provide a forum for academia, industry and government laboratories to exchange knowledge, experience and news on the latest developments in the scientific, methodological and practical aspects of wetting, adhesion, capillarity and accompanying phenomena. Special attention will be paid to the following topics:
• measurement techniques
• modelling and simulation
• experimental characterization
• applications.

C3: Coatings and Surface Modification

Topic coordinators:
George Kiriakidis (Univ. Crete, GR) - kiriakid@iesl.forth.gr
Vladimir Vishnyakov (Univ. Huddersfield, UK) - v.vishnyakov@mmu.ac.uk

C3.1: Light-Induced Micro-Nano Surface Modification

Nadezhda Bulgakova (Inst. of Thermophysics, Russ. Acad. of Sciences, Novosibirsk, RU) - nbul@itp.nsc.ru
Maria Farsari (FORTH, Heraklion, GR) - mfarsari@iesl.forth.gr

This symposium addresses current scientific and technological progress in light-induced micro- and nano-surface modification. Special attention will be paid to the following topics:
• linear and non-linear lithographic techniques for surface structuring
• laser processing of biomaterials for scaffold fabrication
• light surface structuring of biomedical implants
• pulsed laser deposition
• laser processing of materials: micro- and nano-structuring, nanoparticle generation
• direct laser writing.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Chunlei Guo (Univ. Rochester, NY, USA)
Fatih Ömer Ilday (Bilkent Univ., Ankara, TR)
Andrei Kabashin (Aix Marseille Univ., FR)
Sakellaris Mailis (Univ. Southampton, UK)
Aleksandr Ovsianikov (Tech. Univ. Wien, AT)
Dorota Pawlak (Inst. Electronic Mater. Technol., Warsaw, PL)
Emmanuel Stratakis (IESL-FORTH, Heraklion, GR)

C3.2: Assembly-Mediated and Surface-Based Coatings

Vassilis Binas (FORTH, Heraklion, GR) - binasbill@iesl.forth.gr
Alexandros Lappas (FORTH, Heraklion, GR) - lappas@iesl.forth.gr

The symposium aims to provide a forum for academia, industry and government laboratories to exchange knowledge, experience and news on the latest developments in the scientific, methodological and practical aspects of assembly-mediated surface coatings. We invite contributions of original research that would address the field from nanochemistry to device application. Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:
• Experimental and/or theoretical approaches for the functionalization of surfaces and nano-objects with tailored properties
• Bottom-up fabrication (low-cost, scalable, environmentally friendly - in some cases biocompatible) of artificial solids by self-organization (self-assembly) of colloidal nanocrystals
• Synergetic effects of multicomponent nanoparticle-assembled structures
• Collective physical properties (e.g. optical, magnetic, catalytic) of nanocrystal-based metamaterials
• Ligand-stabilized nanoparticle-assembled superlattices: properties and modeling of surface/ interface effects for sustainable energy resource exploration (e.g. conversion, storage, consumption)
• Recent developments in solution-phase chemical synthesis/ processing/ characterization of colloidal nanocrystals for advanced energy-related applications
• Theory and multi-scale modeling of assemblies of heterogeneous nanostructures
• Efficient methods (e.g. synchrotron x-ray scattering, optical and scanning probe techniques) to study static and dynamic properties of functional surfaces and nano-objects, including growth, phase transitions, reactivity, electronic structure and morphology

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Bruno Chaudret (LPCNO - INSA, Toulouse, France)
Maksym Kovalenko (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)
Liberato Manna (Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genova, IT)
Serge Ravaine (CNRS, Univ. Bordeaux, CRPP, FR)
Kalliopi Trohidou (INN, NCSR Demokritos, Athens, GR)

C3.3: Advanced Surface Coating and Plating Techniques

Elias Aperathitis (FORTH, Heraklion, GR) - eaper@physics.uoc.gr
Ulf Jansson (Uppsala Univ., SE) - Ulf.Jansson@kemi.uu.se
Magnus Oden (Linköping Univ., SE) - magod@ifm.liu.se

This symposium addresses current scientific and technological progress in surface modification for photonics and fluidics. Important topics to be covered include:
• surface functionalization and treatment for optofluidics
• plasmonic surfaces for sensing and switching
• light localization on nanostructured surfaces and SERS
• surface protocols for microfluidics and magnetofluidics
• surfaces for random and distributed light scattering and lasing
• surface wettability control
• surface functionalization for biosensing devices
• new functionality surfaces for optical sensors.

C4: Phase transformations, Microstructure Evolution in Polycrystals and Additive Manufacturing

Topic coordinators:
Brigitte Baretzky (KIT, Karlsruhe, DE) - brigitte.baretzky@kit.edu

C4.1: Phase Stability and Phase Transformations

Anton Chyrkin (IEK, Jülich, DE) - a.chyrkin@fz-juelich.de
Olga Fabrichnaya (TU Bergakademie Freiberg, DE) - fabrich@ww.tu-freiberg.de

The symposium aims to provide a forum for academia, industry and government laboratories to exchange knowledge, experience and news on the latest developments in the influence of phase transformations on structure and properties of materials in equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. Important topics to be covered include experimental investigations and theoretical predictions in:
• diffusional phase transformations
• diffusionless (martensitic) phase transformations
• shift of phase boundaries in equilibrium diagrams for nanograined materials
• thermodynamics and kinetics of mass-transfer in nanograined materials.

C4.2: Additive Manufacturing

Tomasz Czujko (Military University of Technology, Warsaw, PL) - tomasz.czujko@wat.edu.pl
Marek Polański (Military University of Technology, Warsaw, PL) - mpolanski@wat.edu.pl

This symposium will focus on the state-of-the-art and trends in the field of additive manufacturing. Topics may include, but are not limited to:
• advanced materials for additive manufacturing (e.g. biomaterials, ceramics, metals, composites, hydrogels, liquid crystals)
• computer modelling and optimization of additive-manufacturing processes
• micro- and nano-fabrication through additive manufacturing
• novel additive-manufacturing processes
• hybrid processes
• performances of additive-manufactured components
• NDT and quality control in additive manufacturing
• applications of additive manufacturing (e.g. biotechnology, medicine, automotive, aerospace, jewellery).

C4.3: Materials for Printed Electronics

Subho Dasgupta (KIT, Karlsruhe, DE) - subho.dasgupta@kit.edu
Horst Hahn (KIT, Karlsruhe, DE) - horst.hahn@kit.edu

High-throughput additive-manufacturing techniques, such as printing, are developing as favourite methods to fabricate new-generation large-area electronics. The activities are spread over many disciplines in science and include materials aspects (i.e. organic molecules, polymers, inorganic nanomaterials or carbon-based materials), processing aspects (i.e. different contact and non-contact printing and dispensing techniques) and device aspects (ranging from transistors and logics, memories, sensors, light-emitting diodes to photovoltaics). The symposium will focus on materials- and processing-related issues aiming to provide functional materials on various substrates with high efficiency and resolution. Contributions on the following topics are particularly welcome:
• Processes:
– ink-jet-printed materials and devices
– large-area gravure printing and screen printing
– contact printing and related material-transfer techniques
– additive manufacturing with high resolution;
• Materials:
– conducting inks, printing of transparent conductors
– electron- or hole-conducting semiconductor materials
– solution-processed high-k dielectrics/insulators
– carbon-based inks for various applications.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Ralf Anselmann (Evonik GmbH, DE)
Thomas Anthopoulos (Imperial College London, UK)
Pedro Barquinha (CENIMAT, Univ. Lisboa, PT)
Joachim Binder (IAM, KIT, Karlsruhe, DE)
Marc Haeming (ANKA, KIT, Karlsruhe, DE)
Gerardo Hernandez Sosa (Heidelberg Innovation Lab., DE)
Michael Hirtz (INT, KIT, Karlsruhe, DE)
Oliver Kraft (IAM, KIT, Karlsruhe, DE)
Luis Perera, CENIMAT, University Lisboa, Portugal
Christian Reitz (INT, KIT, Karlsruhe, DE)
Jana Zaumseil (Univ. Heidelberg, DE)

Area D: Characterization and Modelling

Area coordinators:
Eva Olsson (Chalmers Univ., Gothenburg, SE) - eva.olsson@chalmers.se
Michel Rappaz (EPFL, Lausanne, CH) - michel.rappaz@epfl.ch

D1: Imaging and Spectroscopy

Topic coordinators:
Wolfgang Jäger (Christian-Albrechts-Univ. zu Kiel, DE) - wolfgang.jaeger@tf.uni-kiel.de
Eva Olsson (Chalmers Univ., Gothenburg, SE) - eva.olsson@chalmers.se

This topic covers the characterization of materials in all fields of current materials research, development and applications. The fields include e.g. biomaterials, energy-related materials and soft materials. Aspects of thin films, polycrystalline materials, nanomaterials and interfaces are also of interest. We invite contributions addressing advanced characterization including imaging and spectroscopy using particle beam, light, X-ray and scanning probe methods as well as quantification and method development aiming at revealing relationships between structure and properties on all length scales. Contributions in the following areas are welcome:
• imaging and diffraction
• tomography
• spectroscopy
• in-situ studies.

D1.1: Imaging, Diffraction and Tomography

Sara Bals (EMAT, Univ. Antwerp, BE) - sara.bals@uantwerpen.be
Christophe Koch (Univ. Ulm, DE) - Christoph.Koch@uni-ulm.de
Velimir Radmilović (Univ. Belgrade, RS) - vrradmilovic@tmf.bg.ac.rs

This symposium covers the characterization of materials in all fields of current materials research, development and applications. The fields include e.g. biomaterials, energy-related materials and soft materials. Aspects of thin films, polycrystalline materials, nanomaterials and interfaces are also of interest. We invite contributions on imaging and diffraction addressing characterization including imaging and spectroscopy using particle beam, light, X-ray and scanning probe methods as well as quantification and method development aiming at revealing relationships between structure and properties on all length scales.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Alex Porter (Imperial College, London, UK)
Erdmann Spiecker (CENEM, Univ. Erlangen-Nürnberg, DE)

D1.2: Spectroscopy

Anders Mikkelsen (Lund Univ., SE) - anders.mikkelsen@sljus.lu.se
Maria Varela (Univ. Complutense de Madrid, ES) - mvarela@ucm.es

This symposium covers the characterization of materials in all fields of current materials research, development and applications. The fields include, e.g., biomaterials, energy-related materials and soft materials. Aspects of thin films, polycrystalline materials, nanomaterials and interfaces are also of interest. We invite contributions on spectroscopy addressing characterization, including imaging and spectroscopy using particle-beam, light, X-ray and scanning-probe methods as well as quantification and method development aimed at revealing relationships between structure and properties on all length scales.

D1.3: In-Situ Studies

Guus Rijnders (Univ. Twente, NL) - a.j.h.m.rijnders@utwente.nl
Etienne Snoeck (CEMES, CNRS, Toulouse, FR) - snoeck@cemes.fr

This symposium covers the development of advanced in situ characterization of materials in all fields of current materials research, including nanomaterials, energy-related materials, soft and biomaterials. We invite contributions addressing advanced in situ characterization, including imaging and spectroscopy using TEM, light, X-ray and scanning probe methods, as well as quantification and methods development aiming at revealing relationships between structure and properties on micrometre to sub-nanometre length scales.

D2: Mechanical Characterization

Topic coordinators:
Javier Llorca (IMDEA Materials, Madrid, ES) - javier.llorca@imdea.org
Dierk Raabe (MPI Eisenforschung, Dusseldorf, DE) - d.raabe@mpie.de

This topic covers mechanical characterization of materials at all scales. We aim to attract contributions on the mechanical analysis of advanced materials related to basic research, development and applications. Complex materials including e.g. energy-related materials, nanostructured materials, complex metallic alloys, high-entropy alloys, metal-ceramic composites aerospace materials, polymer-based composites, biological materials, advanced steels, metallic glass and synthetic soft materials are targeted. Interface-dominated materials such as multilayer systems, thin films, polycrystalline materials and nanostructured materials are of high interest. We welcome contributions based on use of novel in-situ micro- and nanomechanical characterization protocols as well as experiments conducted under detrimental environmental influence. Papers combining integrated experimental and modelling methods are of particular interest. Regarding phenomena we aim to attract contributions related to nanoscale mechanics, interfaces, plasticity, damage, failure and corrosion-assisted mechanical effects. Contributions in the following areas are specifically welcome:
• in-situ micro- and nano-mechanical characterization and size effects
• high-throughput mechanical characterization
• interface-related damage and failure
• characterization of the mechanical aspects of hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion and environmental degradation
• mechanical characterization of advanced materials.

D2.1: In-situ Micro- and Nano-Mechanical Characterization and Size Effects, High Throughput and Rapid Mechanical Testing

Jon Molina-Aldareguia (IMDEA Materials, Madrid, ES) - jon.molina@imdea.org
Cem Tasan (MPI Eisenforschung, Dusseldorf, DE) - c.tasan@mpie.de

This symposium will cover the mechanical analysis of advanced materials related to basic research, development and applications. The focus will be on complex materials including e.g. energy-related materials, nanostructured materials, complex metallic alloys, high-entropy alloys, metal-ceramic composites aerospace materials, polymer-based composites, biological materials, advanced steels, metallic glass and synthetic soft materials. Interface-dominated materials such as multilayer systems, thin films, polycrystalline materials and nanostructured materials are also of high interest. We welcome contributions using novel in-situ micro- and nanomechanical characterization protocols as well as experiments conducted under detrimental environmental influence. Papers integrating experimental and modelling methods are of particular interest. We aim to attract contributions on phenomena related to nanoscale mechanics, interfaces, plasticity, damage, failure and corrosion-assisted mechanical effects.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Bill (W.J.) Clegg (Univ. Cambridge, UK)
Gerhard Dehm (MPI für Eisenforschung, Düsseldorf, DE)
Hiroyuki Toda (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka, JP)
Cynthia A. Volkert (Georg-August-Universitat Gottingen)

D2.2: Interface-Related Damage and Failure

Philip Eisenlohr (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, USA) - eisenlohr@egr.msu.edu
Marc Geers (Univ. Eindhoven,NL) - m.g.d.geers@tue.nl
Irene J. Beyerlein (Los Alamos National Laboratory, US) - irene@lanl.gov

This symposium will the mechanical analysis of advanced materials related to basic research, development and applications. The focus will be on complex materials including e.g. energy-related materials, nanostructured materials, complex metallic alloys, high-entropy alloys, metal-ceramic composites aerospace materials, polymer-based composites, biological materials, advanced steels, metallic glass and synthetic soft materials. Interface-dominated materials such as multilayer systems, thin films, polycrystalline materials and nanostructured materials are also of high interest. We welcome contributions using novel in-situ micro- and nano-mechanical characterization protocols as well as experiments conducted under detrimental environmental influence. Papers integrating experimental and modelling methods are of particular interest. We aim to attract contributions on phenomena related to nanoscale mechanics, interfaces, plasticity, damage, failure and corrosion-assisted mechanical effects.

D2.3: Characterization of the Mechanical Aspects of Hydrogen Embrittlement, Corrosion and Environmental Degradation

Motomichi Koyama (Univ. Kyushu, Fukuoka, JP) - koyama@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp
Hisao Matsunaga (Univ. Kyushu, Fukuoka, JP) - matsunaga.hisao.964@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp
Petros Sofronis (Univ. Illinois, Urbana, IL, US) - sofronis@illinois.edu

This symposium will cover the mechanical analysis of advanced materials related to basic research, development and applications. The focus will be on complex materials including e.g. energy-related materials, nanostructured materials, complex metallic alloys, high-entropy alloys, metal-ceramic composites aerospace materials, polymer-based composites, biological materials, advanced steels, metallic glass and synthetic soft materials. Interface-dominated materials such as multilayer systems, thin films, polycrystalline materials and nanostructured materials are also of high interest. We welcome contributions using novel in-situ micro- and nanomechanical characterization protocols as well as experiments conducted under detrimental environmental influence. Papers integrating experimental and modelling methods are of particular interest. We aim to attract contributions on phenomena related to nanoscale mechanics, interfaces, plasticity, damage, failure and corrosion-assisted mechanical effects.

_D2.2: Symposium cancelled

This symposium will cover all aspects associated with high-throughput synthesis and characterization of the functional and mechanical properties of advanced materials related to basic research, development and applications. The focus will be on complex materials including e.g. energy-related materials, nanostructured materials, complex metallic alloys, high-entropy alloys, metal-ceramic composites aerospace materials, polymer-based composites, biological materials, advanced steels, metallic glass and synthetic soft materials. Interface-dominated materials such as multilayer systems, thin films, polycrystalline materials and nanostructured materials are also of high interest. We welcome contributions using novel in-situ micro- and nanoscopic mechanical and functional characterization protocols as well as experiments conducted under detrimental environmental influence. Papers integrating experimental and modelling methods are of particular interest. We aim to attract contributions on phenomena related to functional properties and also to nanoscale mechanics, interfaces, plasticity, damage, failure and corrosion-assisted effects.

D3: Materials Modelling on Different Length Scales

Topic coordinators:
Michel Rappaz (EPFL, Lausanne, CH) - michel.rappaz@epfl.ch

D3.1: Atomistic Modelling

Michele Ceriotti (EPFL, Lausanne, CH) - michele.ceriotti@epfl.ch
Mike Finnis (Imperial College, London, UK) - m.finnis@imperial.ac.uk

This symposium will cover the different aspects of the modelling of materials at the level of individual atoms. It includes both ab-initio calculations and those based on empirical force fields, sampling of configuration space using molecular-dynamics and Monte-Carlo methods, free-energy techniques to assess the stability of different phases and compounds, and high-throughput screening of new materials and alloys. The symposium will demonstrate how atomistic modelling makes it possible to understand structure-property relations in materials, and to calculate the parameters that determine bulk and interface properties, the interactions of materials with chemical species (e.g. catalysis or adsorption), diffusion, ordering in liquids, nucleation, phase transitions, etc. Papers that emphasize results that can be passed to the higher-scale modelling level are strongly encouraged.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Gabor Csanyi (Univ. Cambridge, UK)
Ralf Drautz (Ruhr Univ. Bochum, DE)
Jörg Neugebauer (MPI Eisenforschung, Düsseldorf, DE)
Lars Pastewka (KIT, Karlsruhe, DE)
Marialore Sulpizi (Univ. Mainz, DE)
Alexandre Tkatchenko (Fritz Haber Inst., Berlin, DE)
Joost Vandevondele (ETH Zürich, CH)

D3.2: Modelling of Microstructure and Grain Structure

Christophe Martin (Univ. Grenoble Alpes, FR) - Christophe.Martin@grenoble-inp.fr
Ingo Steinbach (Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, DE) - ingo.steinbach@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

This symposium will focus on modelling of materials at the levels of microstructure and grain structure. The goal will be to present the latest developments in all types of modelling techniques that address the levels of microstructure and grain structure evolution (phase-field, level-set, front-tracking, cellular-automaton, Monte-Carlo, finite-element, discrete-element, mesh-free methods ?). Coupled discrete-continuum methods are also welcomed. We invite contributions concerned with (but not limited to) microstructure-driven phenomena such as:
• diffusion-controlled phase transitions
• mixed mode and massive transformations
• ideal grain growth, drag effect and abnormal grain growth
• texture evolution during large deformation with plastic activity
• recrystallization and recovery
• damage and fracture related to microstructures

D3.3: Materials Thermodynamics and Kinetics

George Kaptay (Bay Zoltán Nonprofit Ltd. for Applied Research, HU) - george.kaptay@bayzoltan.hu
Rainer Schmid-Fetzer (TU Clausthal, DE) - schmid-fetzer@tu-clausthal.de
Hans Seifert (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, KIT, DE) - hans.seifert@kit.edu

The symposium will focus on modelling and simulation of thermodynamics and kinetics for engineering materials (metallic alloys, ceramics, semiconductors, composites) and whole devices e.g. for energy applications (e.g. lithium batteries, turbine components, PCM systems). There is a major progress to report on new methodologies, data and results in computational thermodynamics (CALPHAD) and kinetics (e.g. diffusion modelling). These approaches are progressively used to extend computer databases and develop advanced software for application oriented simulations in multicomponent-multiphase materials systems. They also increasingly allow the coupling of thermodynamic and kinetic data with related electrochemical, thermophysical and mechanical properties. This symposium will give insight on recent advances in these fields. Contributions are invited on:
- modelling and calculation of phase diagrams and thermodynamic functions using methods in computational thermodynamics, e.g. ab-initio and CALPHAD (computer coupling of phase diagrams and thermochemistry
- modelling and calculation of materials kinetics (e.g. diffusion modelling)
- application of thermodynamic and kinetic data for improvement and development of innovative engineering and functional materials and whole functional devices for energy e.g. lithium and post-lithium batteries, supercapacitors
- coupling of thermodynamic and kinetic data with other related materials properties
- experimental studies on phase diagrams, thermodynamic (chemical potentials, enthalpies, heat capacities) and kinetic properties (diffusion and mobility data) which can be used for modelling and database development and refinement.

Area E: Energy and Environment

Area coordinators:
Brett Suddell (Biobased Solutions Ltd, UK) - brettsuddell@biobasedsolutions.co.uk

E1: Materials for Energy

Topic coordinators:
Stuart Irvine (CSER, Glyndŵr University, St Asaph, UK) - s.irvine@glyndwr.ac.uk

E1.1: Materials for Energy

Peter Flewitt (Univ. Bristol, UK) - Peter.Flewitt@bristol.ac.uk
Peter Hall (Univ. Sheffield, UK) - peter.hall@sheffield.ac.uk
Stuart Irvine (CSER, Glyndŵr University, St Asaph, UK) - s.irvine@glyndwr.ac.uk
Allan Walton (Univ. Birmingham, UK) - a.walton@bham.ac.uk
Trystan Watson (Univ. Swansea, UK) - t.m.watson@swansea.ac.uk

With worldwide plans to extend the operating life of existing fission electrical power generating plants, build new plant and underwrite long-term storage of the associated waste, there is an increasing interest in how materials respond in such hostile environments. This symposium will address the underlying mechanisms that lead to the degradation of the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of nuclear materials and the implications for underwriting long-term service and waste storage. Both theoretical and experimental approaches will be considered together with implications for design of new plant and long-term service.

E2: Natural Materials

Topic coordinators:
Brett Suddell (Biobased Solutions Ltd, UK) - brettsuddell@biobasedsolutions.co.uk

E2.1: Natural Materials

Martin Ansell (Univ. Bath, UK) - M.P.Ansell@bath.ac.uk
Stuart Coles (Univ. Warwick, UK) - Stuart.Coles@warwick.ac.uk
Kerry Kirwan (Univ. Warwick, UK) - Kerry.Kirwan@warwick.ac.uk
Brett Suddell (Biobased Solutions Ltd, UK) - brettsuddell@biobasedsolutions.co.uk

BioComposites demonstrate high strength and high toughness and have been developed for a range of rigorous environments: a surge of interest in utilising these ?greener? materials has now led to a number of new innovations. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the innovative use of natural materials predominantly within novel composite systems. It will also show how these materials are being used to provide green ?alternative? products for a range of applications within a number of sectors. This has been demonstrated in applications within the automotive industry, construction, leisure goods, packaging and consumer industries where many developments have occurred as a result of an increased interest in sustainable technologies. Another important consideration are the disposal issues of these materials which tie in with European legislation; this has become known as the 'polluter pays' ethos where manufacturers have to take into account the 'end of life' of their products. This symposium will also focus on the end of life issues being faced by these novel materials.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Keith Spilsbury (Woolcool, Market Drayton, UK)

E3: Materials for Transportation

Topic coordinators:
Michal Basista (IPPT, Polish Acad of Sciences, PL) - michal.basista@kmm-vin.eu

E3.1: Materials for Transportation

Michal Basista (IPPT, Polish Acad of Sciences, PL) - michal.basista@kmm-vin.eu
Jörg Hohe (Fraunhofer Inst. Mech. Materials IWM, Freiburg, DE) - joerg.hohe@iwm.fraunhofer.de

Important drivers in vehicle design for both ground transport and aerospace are fuel efficiency and safety: this symposium addresses the former. The need to apply lightweight materials and structures to reduce the overall vehicle weight has triggered ample research and development efforts on a variety of metallic (magnesium, aluminium, high-strength steel) as well as in non-metallic (reinforced plastics) materials. The focus of the symposium is on those avenues explored in materials for transportation to realise substantial weight savings over current structural designs. This embraces ? but is not limited to ? the development of alloys, composites, foams and their associated manufacturing technologies (including, amongst others, the joining of dissimilar materials), as well as dedicated design strategies and solutions. Non-structural materials (such as for windows and fabrics) are not within the scope of this symposium.

E4: Materials for Extreme Environments

Topic coordinators:
Bill Lee (Imperial College, London, UK) - w.e.lee@imperial.ac.uk
Luc Vandeperre (Imperial College, London, UK) - l.vandeperre@imperial.ac.uk

E4.1: Materials for Extreme Environments

Finn Giuliani (Imperial College, London, UK) - f.giuliani@imperial.ac.uk
Luc Vandeperre (Imperial College, London, UK) - l.vandeperre@imperial.ac.uk

Ultra-high temperature ceramics are a class of non-oxide ceramics with very high melting points which are being actively investigated for use in extremely demanding environments such as in thermal protection systems for supersonic flight and re-entry vehicles. Very promising results are being achieved, but at the same time there remain substantial challenges in terms of high-quality powders, more flexible processing, oxidation resistance and our limited knowledge of the thermo-mechanical behaviour at temperature. This symposium will focus on powder processing, manufacturing of complex shapes and scale-up, thermal and mechanical properties and the relation with microstructure and composition, machining and joining.

Area F: Biomaterials and Healthcare

Area coordinators:
Francis Cambier (BCRC, Mons, BE) - f.cambier@bcrc.be
Laura Montanaro (Politecnico di Torino, IT) - laura.montanaro@polito.it

F1: New Frontiers in Biomaterials

Topic coordinators:
Jérôme Chevalier (Univ. Lyon, FR) - jerome.chevalier@insa-lyon.fr
Claudio Migliaresi (Univ. Trento, IT) - claudio.migliaresi@unitn.it
Frank Witte (Charité Medical Univ. Berlin, DE) - frank.witte@charite.de

Great advances have been made in recent years on all classes of biomaterials, including polymers, ceramics and glasses, metals and their composites. New materials with improved mechanical and/or biological performances have been developed, aiming towards multi-functional implants able to resist complex loading and environment. Both volume and surface properties are considered, with the aim of developing positive biological interactions and long-term performance. Materials for scaffold and tissue engineering applications have been achieved, with a high level of material-cell or material-tissue interactions. Biomaterials can be processed by innovative techniques, to create multi-scale, 3D hierarchical materials, with biomimetic features. On demand, they can be degraded at a rate required in the application. In this regard, huge progress has been made in the area of bio-resorbable polymers, ceramics and even metals.
The latest achievements are also dedicated to low-temperature synthesis, bio-mineralization, surface modifications of implants, or to the grafting of inorganic micro- and nano-spheres with biomolecules to promote biological interactions. With the aim of developing successful, long-lasting implants, there is also continuing research on characterization methods.
The symposia in this Topic will focus on new findings in the field of materials for orthopaedic, dental, cardiovascular and cancer treatments, as well as for applications in regenerative medicine and drug delivery. Contributions will be particularly welcome on new approaches to materials design, advanced synthesis and processing methods, new compositions with improved properties or surface modification, and multi-scale and multi-physics assessments of biomaterials.

F1.1: The Next Generation of Implants with Multi-functional Properties – Advances in the synthesis, process and surface modification of Biomaterials

Jérôme Chevalier (Univ. Lyon, FR) - jerome.chevalier@insa-lyon.fr
Claudio Migliaresi (Univ. Trento, IT) - claudio.migliaresi@unitn.it
Frank Witte (Charité Medical Univ. Berlin, DE) - frank.witte@charite.de

This symposium will review the state of the art and trends in the field of advanced synthesis and processing methods of biomaterials. The aim is to underline progress in the field of bottom-up approaches in which nano-powders or polymers are synthesized or modified via innovative routes. New processing techniques or methodologies able to create new nano-structured and/or architectured biomaterials at different scales will be treated, including trends to develop 3D and biomimetic structures. This will include contributions on all types of biomaterials, at any scale to ensure cross-fertilization between specialists of metallic, inorganic and organic materials and experts in nano-sized objects as well as in structural materials.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Laurent David (Univ. Claude Bernard, Lyon, FR)
Nikolaos Michailidis (Aristotle Univ. Thessaloniki, GR)
Elisa Boanini (University of Bologna, Italy)
Thierry Gloriant (INSA Rennes, France)

F2: Tissue Engineering; Regenerative Medicine; Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery

Topic coordinators:
Aldo R. Boccaccini (Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg, DE) - aldo.boccaccini@ww.uni-erlangen.de
Elisabeth Engel (Inst. for Bioengineering of Catalonia, ES) - eengel@ibecbarcelona.eu
João Mano (Univ. Minho, PT) - jmano@dep.uminho.pt

This topic covers the general areas of biomaterial applications in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, nanomedicine and drug delivery. The focus is on scientific and technological aspects related to the design, fabrication and characterisation of innovative biomaterials for established and emerging applications in the mentioned fields. The two symposia in the Topic will offer an excellent platform for presentation and discussion of the most recent and relevant results in this highly interdisciplinary field.

F2.1: Materials in Regenerative Medicine, Nanomedicine and for Drug Delivery

Aldo R. Boccaccini (Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg, DE) - aldo.boccaccini@ww.uni-erlangen.de
Elisabeth Engel (Inst. for Bioengineering of Catalonia, ES) - eengel@ibecbarcelona.eu
João Mano (Univ. Minho, PT) - jmano@dep.uminho.pt

This symposium aims to cover a variety of scaffold systems and to present the latest results from in-vivo studies. Several novel concepts and related processing technologies are being developed to produce multifunctional scaffolds combining mechanical stability with functionalities such as electrical or magnetic stimulation and biomolecular signalling. In addition the emerging field of biofabrication is impacting the development of scaffolds to replicate tissue and organ structures including vascularization strategies and 3D cell encapsulation approaches. Such novel scaffold concepts provide enhanced biological performance beyond being a simple mechanical support for cell attachment and growth. Numerous polymeric, ceramic, hydrogel, hybrid and composite matrices, involving smart combinations of natural and synthetic materials and incorporating specific biomolecules and nanoscale topography and functionalities, are being developed. Also of interest as structural supports for cells are multilayered films with highly controllable composition, targeting specific cell responses. The symposium will include coverage of the interaction of biomaterials and cells, highlighting the effect of patterned and textured surfaces, exhibiting topological and hierarchical organization, on cell functions for regenerative purposes. Thus the most recent and promising advances in the field of biomaterials for soft- and hard-tissue engineering will be discussed. The symposium will highlight the role of biomaterials science in this ever-evolving interdisciplinary field, bringing together materials scientists, cell biologists, biomedical researchers and tissue engineers.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Stoyan Smoukov (Univ. Cambridge, UK)

F3: Materials and Devices for Emerging Healthcare Technologies

Topic coordinators:
Jolanta Baranowska (West Pomeranian Univ. Technology, Szczecin, PL) - Jolanta.Baranowska@zut.edu.pl
Steve Franklin (Philips, Eindhoven, NL) - s.e.franklin@philips.com
Karine Salim (PCAS, Paris, FR) - Karine.salim@pcas.com

This strongly cross-disciplinary topic will explore advances in materials for medical devices used in emerging healthcare technologies. There is a special focus on gaining new insights into the beneficial or detrimental interactions of materials and devices with human tissue and how to control these interactions. Also included are the interaction of materials aspects with device design, manufacturing, miniaturization and materials integration, and modelling and testing strategies. In order to ensure a wide range of medical-device applications, an appropriate balance will be sought between contributions dealing with soft and hard human tissues.
Publication of proceedings: selected papers from this Topic, subject to peer review, will be published in the Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials or in Biotribology.

F3.1: Materials Interactions with Human Tissue and Implications in Medical Device Design

Steve Franklin (Philips, Eindhoven, NL) - s.e.franklin@philips.com
Ruxandra Gref (Univ. Paris Sud, FR) - ruxandra.gref@u-psud.fr

During medical procedures, the physical interaction of medical devices and materials with human tissue can lead to complications with serious consequences for the patient or procedure. The nature of the interactions and their relationship with known medical complications, and the path to influencing the interactions through materials and design, are often uncertain. This symposium will review: 1) advances in materials and coatings for influencing the physical interaction of medical devices with human tissue and the resulting biochemical response; 2) new insights into interactions of materials with human tissue and how to control these interactions; 3) advanced modelling of interactions between medical devices and human tissue and; 4) new insights into the biotribology of medical devices against the human body.
Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:

Piotr Sobolewski (West Pomeranian Univ. Technology, Szczecin, PL)
Zeike Taylor (Univ. Sheffield, UK)

F3.2: Materials and Strategies for the In-vitro Simulation of Human In-vivo Conditions

Jolanta Baranowska (West Pomeranian Univ. Technology, Szczecin, PL) - Jolanta.Baranowska@zut.edu.pl
Stéphane Hocquet (BCRC, Mons, BE) - s.hocquet@bcrc.be
Sheila MacNeil (Univ. Sheffield, UK) - s.macneil@sheffield.ac.uk

When developing new materials and devices for healthcare technologies, the necessary pre-screening and pre-clinical testing at early stages in the development process are hampered by practical and regulatory issues, leading to long predevelopment times and costs, as well as uncertainties in the interpretation of test results. There is an obvious ethical wish or need to avoid animal testing. In addition, the use of in-vivo and ex-vivo tissue leads to large variability in the test results and there are often problems with the availability of such materials in a form suitable for testing. The aim of this symposium will be to review: 1) advances in synthetic and tissue-engineered materials to simulate the physical, mechanical and/or biochemical behaviour of human tissue; 2) advances in testing strategies for the in-vitro simulation of human in-vivo conditions, for the evaluation of medical materials and devices and; 3) new insights into the mechanical and physical properties of human tissues, and methods or strategies for the measurement of these properties.

Invited speakers in this Symposium will include:
Miroslawa El Fray (West Pomeranian Univ. Technology, Szczecin, PL)
John Haycock (Univ. Sheffield, UK)
Jaap den Toonder (Tech. Univ. Eindhoven, NL)

Area G: Education and Technology Transfer

Area coordinators:

Dr.-Ing. Margarethe Hofmann-Amtenbrink (MatSearch Consulting, Pully, Switzerland) - mhofmann@matsearch.ch

Area G - Introduction

Expertise in Materials Science and Engineering is requested at all levels of the value chain, starting from education and research towards application and re-use or dissipation of materials and elements. The Side Event G, which was organised at EUROMAT 2013 for the first time, will cover these topics by inviting speakers from industrial, governmental and academic organisations to discuss urgent needs and prevailing R&D outcomes. Participants of EUROMAT 2015 are invited to follow the 90 minutes sessions each day during lunch time presented by three invited speakers per session and a round table discussion at the end.

G1: Education and career

Topic coordinators:
Prof. Paloma Fernández (Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid, Spain) - arana@fis.ucm.es

The session is scheduled around a main stem which could summarized in Long Live Learning. Nowadays, the necessity of improving the Science Culture is recognized from most European authorities. For this purpose, improving science education at school in the MINT areas whereby "MINT" stands for mathematics, informatics, natural sciences, and technics, is crucial, not with the aim that every person becomes a scientist, but sensitive to the importance of Science. Interested teachers and professors are invited to this session as well as engineers and young scientists.

Speakers
1. Responsible Research and Innovation, a new paradigm in Horizon 2020
Adam Zieliński (Foundation for Polish Science, Warsaw, PL) - zielinski@fnp.org.pl [more info]
2. Stimulating the public attitude towards Advanced Materials
Konstantinos P. Giannakopoulos (Laboratory for Electron Microscopy and Nanomaterials, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Centre for Scientific Research "Demokritos", GR) - k.giannakopoulos@inn.demokritos.gr [more info]

G2: The role of Research and Technology organizations in promoting Transfer of Materials Technologies

Topic coordinators:
Prof. Heinrich Hofmann (Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne Switzerland) - heinrich.hofmann@epfl.ch

The transfer of academic research results towards industrial application is still a challenging task because several stakeholders are implemented at different time points in the development process which may have a duration of more than 10 years. Examples are technical ceramic, super alloys, superconductors, nanomaterials, all materials which needed or still need lot of effort to be accepted for industrial applications. Important factors for this transfer are, beside high quality research, education of potential “customers”, standardisation, competition between different technologies, acceptance by the end user and market potential. A well known example for technology and innovation transfer is the research program of the European Commission, which is a mix of a top-down approach by giving the research topics, often promoted in a bottom-up process in a very narrow area. This session likes to discuss the different approaches which exist in EU, US and Asia and an additional focus will be given of the methods and tools to promote and to accelerate the technology transfer of new materials.

Speakers
1. Global opportunities to bring top research to market
Felix Moesner (Consul, CEO, Swiss-Nex Boston, Boston, USA) - felix@swissnexboston.org [more info]
2. Bridging research and industrial development in Materials Science: The Swiss Model
Prof. Heinrich Hofmann (Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne Switzerland) - heinrich.hofmann@epfl.ch [more info]
3. The long road from Invention to Innovation: guidelines for researchers and their organisations
Prof. Dr George Vekinis (Advanced Ceramics and Composite Materials and Processes, Researcher Director, Head, Advanced Ceramics Laboratory, NCSR "Demokritos", GREECE) - g.vekinis@inn.demokritos.gr [more info]

G3: Strategic Materials for Europe

Topic coordinators:
Dr.-Ing. Margarethe Hofmann-Amtenbrink (MatSearch Consulting, Pully, Switzerland) - mhofmann@matsearch.ch

The global economy is moving towards environmentally friendly and clean technologies in most of our important technology fields like energy, transportation, communication and healthcare. Although materials and materials processing are known since hundreds of years their increased complexity and functionality make them important as strategic element in the global market competition. The session will bring some case studies from metals, ceramics and combined materials in the various industrial sectors to show the importance of raw materials, materials processing and the additional expertise in modelling and characterisation of materials and components.

Speakers
1. Metallurgy Europe - forging ahead !
David Jarvis (Head of Strategic & Emerging Technologies (TEC-TS), European Space Agency - ESA/ESTE, NL) - david.john.jarvis@esa.int [more info]
2. Innovative Impact by High Performance Ceramics
Wolfgang Rossner (Head of Research Group, Siemens AG
Corporate Technology
Research and Technology Center
CT RTC MAT CPM-DE, Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, München, DE) - wolfgang.rossner@siemens.com [more info]
3. Rethinking Plastics as Materials: Opportunities for innovation.
Rudy Koopmans (Dow Europe GmbH, R&D Fellow EMEA, Horgen, Switzerland) - rjkoopmans@dow.com [more info]

G4: Relevance of Resources Strategies and Global Competition

Topic coordinators:
Dr. Christian Hagelüken (Umicore AG & Co. KG, Director EU Government Affairs, D-63403 Hanau Wolfgang) -

In the last 50 years the number of elements used for modern technologies and especially functional parts in electronics, energy and transport has drastically increased. At the same time the access to many metal resources ensuring the functions of such products became critical either by limitations in the primary supply chain or through geopolitical hurdles. The session will give examples of technologies/products, where Europe is strong in technology in the global context but for which we are depending on raw materials we don’t have sufficiently in Europe. The presentations will cover selected areas of strong European technologies and show their respective strategies to address the resource issue.

Speakers
1. Sustainable supply and utilisation of Germanium
Jensen Verhelle () - Jensen.Verhelle@eu.umicore.com [more info]
2. Smart materials as success factor for EU competitiveness (in energy solutions)
Dr. Fabrice Stassin (CEO, EMIRI) - fabrice.stassin@emiri.eu [more info]
3. Not yet confirmed - Potential presentation: The broader perspective - what should industry and policy do to cope with the issue?
Martin Stuchtey (Director McKinsey ) - @ [more info]